Todd Alcott
02 November 2007 @ 11:48 am







greyenigma  asks: "I'm often confused about just where act breaks occur.  Reviews often mention them as if they're obvious, but they aren't to me.  Do you know of a good primer that would help me understand this?"

My father once described it to me like this:

In Act I, a guy gets stuck up in a tree, in Act II they throw rocks at him, in Act III he gets down from the tree.

Strangely enough, if you take out "tree" and put in "collapsed skyscraper," you have exactly the plot of Oliver Stone's World Trade Center, so let's look at the structure of that.



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Todd Alcott







"I'm now beginning to understand your appreciation of the genius of Schwarzenegger's performance in Terminator 2." -- urbaniak, mid-way through Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines

Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines is the perfect expression of commerce trying, and failing, to overtake artistry. The makers of Terminator 3 felt that if they hit enough "Terminator-related plot points," presented in a new, interesting way and with a large enough budget, they would have another Terminator movie. But let's not delude ourselves: Terminator 3 is the work of skilled, talented professionals and Terminator 2 is the work of a great artist.

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Todd Alcott
My apologies for the recent lack of postings -- I am finishing up an assignment and have been dealing with two kids over the moon about the arrival of Halloween.

I have little of interest to report -- or perhaps, more accurately, I have little energy at the moment to report anything. However:



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Todd Alcott
25 October 2007 @ 05:28 am





The Terminator perfectly embodies two crucial truths about motion pictures:

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